The little guys in Tighnabruaich

During their recent trip to Scotland, the little guys had the pleasure of spending a week in the rather excellent village of Tighnabruaich. Situated on the picturesque Kyles of Bute, Tighnabruaich is part of ‘Argyll’s Secret Coast’ and is a popular sailing destination for those intrepid enough to venture this far north.

The Crew had done some planning this time, so knew before they arrived that Tighnabruaich has its own lifeboat station. But they couldn’t wait to get down to the water’s edge to check it out for themselves. And here they are…

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The station was founded in 1967 with a D class lifeboat, which was kept in a boathouse in the grounds of the Tighnabruaich Hotel. The station swapped the D class for a C class in the early 1990. In 1998, the C class was itself swapped for a larger Atlantic 75, which was in turn replaced by the station’s current Atlantic 85.

The present boathouse was built in 1997 and is situated right on the shores of the Kyles of Bute. It has a slipway for launching the boat as well as a new floating pontoon extending out towards the Isle of Bute. The station has a considerable operating area, too, stretching around the Cowal peninsula and well up into Loch Fyne – almost an hour from the station at top speed.

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The station’s Atlantic 85 James and Helen Mason was launched in 2012 and, like the boat of the same class at the Crew’s home station of Portishead, has a crew of four and is powered by two 115 horsepower outboard engines, giving her a maximum speed of 35 knots. And here she is…

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Incidentally, the James and Helen Mason made waves at her naming ceremony by launching with an all female crew, including helm Kim Thomas, whom we had the pleasure of meeting during our visit. (And again the next day on the Tarbert-Portavadie ferry!)

The little guys had timed their visit to coincide with one of the station’s training sessions, so were delighted to meet Lifeboat Operations Manager (LOM) Ronnie and members of the crew. They hung out for a while in the crew room upstairs in the boathouse, learning about the station’s history, and were then invited (to their great excitement) to have a look around the boat hall.

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Like Portishead’s Atlantic 85, the James and Helen Mason is launched from a carriage, which is pushed out of the boathouse and down the slipway by a rugged County tractor. The tractor itself is marinised, which means that it can wade safely to a depth of 1.5 metres. (You’ll notice that RNLI tractor drivers wear lifejackets, too!)

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The little guys felt somewhat dwarfed by the tractor’s huge tyres, but that’s quite a common feeling when you’re only an inch and a half tall. And they were soon distracted by the Atlantic on her carriage, freshly washed and ready to launch at a moment’s notice.

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After a while, though, it started to get a bit late and the little guys (and the Tighnabruaich crew) were keen to get home for their tea. It was fantastic, though, to visit a station so similar to the Crew’s own and to learn how the Tighnabruaich crew operate in the challenging waters off the Scottish coast. (And the little guys had to admit that the scenery here is far nicer than at home – sorry Portishead!)

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So a massive thank you to the crew at Tighnabruaich for their hospitality and for taking the time to show us around and to tell us all about their fantastic station. We hope to see you again soon!

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